Tag Archives: g++

Stupid C++ vs C# performance comparison

I found out that there is real test than the little one i did here. In fact the main interest of the post is this spreadsheet :

I recently did a simple and stupid comparison test between C++ (g++) and C# .Net (mono).

My point here is that C# can actually be considered as a very fast language. It allows automatic hardware-specific optimization. The only real drawback you have in the .Net framework is the garbage collector. It prevents the C# .Net it from being a realtime language/framework. But does it really matter for you ?

The purpose of the following test is to show that C++ isn’t faster than C# “as is”. I KNOW C# can not be faster than C++ because C# can do few hardware specific optimizations when you can do all of them in C++, because all the systems calls have to be done in C/C++ and because there’s no such thing like Template and forced inlining in C#.

But if you’re searching for arguments to choose C# .Net over native C++, you should also consider these :

SO ! Here is the test…

I wrote these two sample programs :

One in C++ :

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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
 
long stupidThing( long nb ) {
	long out = 1;
	while( nb > 0 )
		out *= nb--;
 
 
	return out;
}
 
int main() {
 
	long total = 0;
 
	for( int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i )
		for( long l = 0; l < 100; ++l )
			total += stupidThing( l );
 
	cout << "Total : " << total << endl;
 
	return 0;
}

One in C# :

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using System;
 
namespace test {
        class Program {
                static long stupidThing( long nb ) {
                        long ret = 1;
                        while ( nb > 0 )
                                ret *= nb--;
                        return ret;
                }
 
                static void Main( string[] args ) {
 
                        long total = 0;
 
                        for ( int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i )
                                for ( long l = 0; l < 100; ++l )
                                        total += stupidThing( l );
                        Console.WriteLine( "Total : {0}", total );
                }
        }
}

First of all, I open a shell in real-time priority, because I don’t want my other processses to mess with my tests :

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# rtprio 99 bash

Then I compile the two programs :

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# gmcs test.cs
# g++ -O4 test.cpp -o test

And then I launch my test :

On a 64 bits host :

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Kernel : 2.6.9-023stab051.3-smp #1 SMP Wed Nov 4 18:36:34 MSK 2009 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
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# time ./test ; time ./test ; time ./test ; time mono test.exe ; time mono test.exe ; time mono test.exe
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    0m12.433s
user    0m12.394s
sys     0m0.049s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    0m12.415s
user    0m12.411s
sys     0m0.014s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    0m12.430s
user    0m12.411s
sys     0m0.026s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    0m10.311s
user    0m10.287s
sys     0m0.029s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    0m10.254s
user    0m10.247s
sys     0m0.011s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    0m10.250s
user    0m10.255s
sys     0m0.012s

C# clearly beats C++ here. Well

On a 32 bits host :

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Kernel : 2.6.30-2-686 #1 SMP Fri Dec 4 00:53:20 UTC 2009 i686 GNU/Linux
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# time ./test ; time ./test ; time ./test ; time mono test.exe ; time mono test.exe ; time mono test.exe
Total : 100461056
 
real    1m10.927s
user    1m7.376s
sys     0m0.056s
Total : 100461056
 
real    1m12.590s
user    1m8.976s
sys     0m0.020s
Total : 100461056
 
real    1m13.279s
user    1m9.532s
sys     0m0.056s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    2m22.492s
user    2m15.260s
sys     0m0.136s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    2m23.002s
user    2m15.760s
sys     0m0.104s
Total : -6192109806162068864
 
real    2m25.102s
user    2m17.709s
sys     0m0.144s

C++ beats C# here, but in 32 bits C++ use other types whereas C# use the same. In C# long is always 64 bits, in C++ it can be 64 bits or 32 bits (depending on the current architecture).